“I am a debtor” — On the two-hundredth birthday of Robert Murray M’Cheyne

May 21, 2013

Today would have been the two-hundredth birthday of Robert Murray M’Cheyne (1813-1843), who was a faithful pastor in a small church in Dundee, Scotland for six years, until his early death at age 29. A life so short, and in many ways very ordinary, yet so powerfully used.

M’Cheyne is perhaps best known today for his widely used Bible reading plan, which goes through the Old Testament once every year, and the Psalms and New Testament twice (see this post for more info and suggestions).  He followed this plan much of his short life, and it was from this deep well that he ministered so powerfully.

M’Cheyne left few writings behind, but he was a memorable poet.  He wrote the following poem, titled “I am a debtor”, around 1837: Read the rest of this entry »

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Weekend Web Watch 16 March 2013

March 16, 2013

In this WWW: Five theses on anti-intellectualism; “The Anti-Beatitudes, as taught by Satan”; fundamentals for a new reformation; “single, satisfied, and sent: mission for the not-yet-married”; cautions before engaging in controversy; the gospel and Biblical theology in poetry; and more conference media. Read the rest of this entry »


Weekend Web Watch 17 February 2013

February 17, 2013

In this WWW: Ten reasons youth leave church; “How can I tell if I’m called to pastoral ministry?”; advice on parenting young kids; poets and theologians; Stuart Townend asks, “Do we really need more worship songs?”; and Bach’s Toccata and Fugue in D minor played on the glass harp.

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“Immanuel” — a poem by Charles Spurgeon

February 16, 2013

Charles Haddon Spurgeon. Public domain image from Wikimedia.Two posts on the blog All Things Expounded, on the subject Poets and Theologians (part 1 | part 2), tipped me off that Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-1892), the great nineteenth-century British “Prince of Preachers”, wrote a few poems and hymns, including a beautiful communion hymn.  i love reading Spurgeon’s books and sermons, which are full of joy in Christ despite the immense hardships he faced.  Spurgeon wrote the following poem, titled Immanuel (meaning, “God with us”; see Matthew 1:23), when he was 18.  It appears in volume one of his Autobiography. Read the rest of this entry »


Risen from the grave monstrosity

February 8, 2013

What is this now I see,

this grave monstrosity?

The sinful heart’s fecundity

gave birth to dead depravity,

set me always at enmity

against the holy Majesty.

 

And how would I be free

from my profanity?

Self-righteousness is vanity

and leaves me yet His enemy,

for I cannot live perfectly

and He alone will judge justly.

 

But finally I see

my sin nailed to the tree:

The death that was reserved for me

instead has fallen upon Thee;

I can but trust and bow the knee:

Thy blood alone bought liberty,

and I am Thine eternally.


Weekend Web Watch 3 February 2013

February 3, 2013

In this WWW: Desiring God (Machen style); McGrath on his new biography on CS Lewis; John Donne’s “A hymn to God the Father”; Proclamation Trust audio archives free to download; John Lennox in Cape Town; How much do I need to know to be saved?; three dangers of social media; why churches should disciple college-age students; why the Psalms start as they do; and William Lane Craig and Alex Rosenberg debate whether faith in God is reasonable.

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Weekend Web Watch 19 January 2013

January 19, 2013

In this WWW: Science and Christianity; how C.S. Lewis wrote The Chronicles of Narnia, and how we should read them; theology and doxology belong together; the danger of mission statements; and Leonard Cohen’s song Hallelujah gets a lease on new life. Read the rest of this entry »