Weekend Web Watch 16 March 2013

March 16, 2013

In this WWW: Five theses on anti-intellectualism; “The Anti-Beatitudes, as taught by Satan”; fundamentals for a new reformation; “single, satisfied, and sent: mission for the not-yet-married”; cautions before engaging in controversy; the gospel and Biblical theology in poetry; and more conference media. Read the rest of this entry »

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The Master’s Seminary lectures now available online

February 24, 2013

The Master’s Seminary (TMS), founded in 1986 by John MacArthur to provide top-class training to future pastors and teachers, last week announced their Theological Resource Center.  The Theological Resource Center is intended to be a free, worldwide extension of TMS for pastors and others who cannot attend classes at its campus near Los Angeles, California.  It features free videos of graduate-level lectures from The Master’s Seminary (along with faculty lecture series addressing specific issues, chapel messages, and The Master’s Seminary Journal), chapel and conferences messages from The Master’s College (a Christian liberal arts college), sermons from Grace Community Church (where MacArthur has pastored and has preached verse-by-verse since 1969), and MacArthur’s sermon library and daily devotions from Grace to You.

Among the courses i am particularly excited to learn from are Steven Lawson’s 12 lectures on Expository Preaching in the Psalms, and William Barrick’s Hebrew Grammar I and Hebrew Grammar II, which so far are the only complete, free Biblical Hebrew courses I’ve come across (and Barrick is a top teacher and Hebrew scholar, having been involved in Bible translation projects).  At the moment there are also courses available in systematic theology, Old and New Testament survey, and marriage and family counselling.


2013 bibliographic guides for Old and New Testament from Denver Seminary

January 19, 2013

Each year faculty of Denver Seminary compile helpful bibliographic guides for Old and New Testament studies. This year’s bibliographies have just been published in the Denver Journal, and they are excellent resources for Bible students and pastors, covering introduction and background, theology, language, criticism and exegesis, hermeneutics, etcetera., and offering recommendations of commentaries for each book. The bibliographies also highlight those books which faculty consider most important and helpful. This is well worth bookmarking or printing.


Reading the Bible in 2013

January 1, 2013

How sweet are Your words to my taste, sweeter than honey to my mouth!
(Psalm 119, ESV)

The past few years i have stuck to a particular plan in reading the Bible which i have found to be very helpful.  i know that unless i have a plan by which i may measure progress, and in which others can join me, i am likely to neglect my reading of the Bible, and will stagnate to the jeopardy of my life and joy.  i still battle, often, to read each day; but i find that my own progress and joy in the faith are inextricably bound up in prayerful reading of the Bible.  i want, like Job, to “treasure the words of His mouth more than my portion of food” (Job 23).  The missionary George Mueller (1805-1898) once said, “I saw more clearly than ever, that the first great and primary business to which I ought to attend every day was, to have my soul happy in the Lord.  I saw that the most important thing I had to do was to give myself to the reading of the word of God, and to meditation on it…”

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Collecting and organising Christian resources

November 12, 2009

i’ve got a lot of talks, articles, sermons, etc. that i’ve been collecting over the past few years.  i’m trying to put together a good resource library to share with others — all stuff that’s freely available on the Internet, but sometimes hard to find, and expensive to download here in South Africa — and starting to review and promote some of it here on my blog (see, for example, the recent post on Gordon Fee’s excellent series of talks on Reading and studying the Bible for life).  i’m hoping to dedicate some time in December/January to cataloguing it a bit better, but basically at this stage i’ve got the following major collections: Read the rest of this entry »


Reading and studying the Bible for life

October 31, 2009

How to read the Bible for all its worthThe past couple days i’ve redeemed the time listening to a series of three talks Gordon Fee presented on how to read the Bible.  Fee, who is professor of New Testament at Regent College, Vancouver, is widely known for two books he co-authored with Douglas Stuart, How to read the Bible for all its worth and How to read the Bible book by book.  These two are excellent books for anyone who desires to read and understand the Bible better, and i heartily recommend them. Read the rest of this entry »


Redeeming the time

October 31, 2009

My friend Bradley keeps exhorting me to “redeem the time” (echoing Ephesians 5:16) — something i’m trying to take to heart.  Some years back, when i first started exploring Project Gutenberg and the Christian Classics Ethereal Library and playing with text-to-speech synthesis, i discovered that i could “read” some of the classics, or articles and lecture transcripts while messing about the house or waiting for sleep to come.  i managed to “read” through Dickens’ Nicholas Nickleby, Chesterton’s Orthodoxy, and many other great books in the public domain like this.  Now, as broadband has become cheaper, i’ve been able to collect some fantastic audio resources over the past few years.  i always keep a few series of lectures or sermons on my phone, ready to listen to while washing dishes, walking to places, or waiting for trains.  i intend to highlight some of these here over the next while.

When i’m at my computer, i use VLC Media Player for playing media files.  One of the benefits of VLC is that it allows one to speed up playback without affecting the pitch.  i find that i can generally increase the playback speed by 40-50% or more and thus listen to an hour-long lecture in only 40 minutes.

i seldom go anywhere without a book and Bible in my bag, but i have still found it useful to keep an electronic Bible on my phone.  i’ve downloaded a couple of free ones from GoBible (KJV) and BiblePhone (various translations in several languages available).  From the latter site i’ve also downloaded a Greek New Testament (Westcott-Hort text) and Hebrew Old Testament for my phone — so now i can continue my attempt at learning Greek wherever i am.  These are all Java MIDP 1.0 or MIDP 2.0 applications, so they should work on most recent Java-capable cellphones (mine is about three years old).